Tom Willemann Health Tips

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What is Frozen Shoulder?

What is Frozen Shoulder?

What is Frozen Shoulder?Frozen shoulder, also known as, Adhesive Capsulitis is an inflammatory and debilitating condition that causes severe stiffness and pain within the shoulder joint. During the course of this condition, the capsule that covers the shoulder and the shoulder ligament become inflamed and eventually causes fibrosis of the capsule, which leads to theContinue Reading »

Rehabilitation of Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability

Rehabilitation of Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability

Anatomy of the ShoulderThe shoulder complex comprises the humerus, clavicle, and scapular, which form four different joints, including the glenohumeral joint, sternoclavicular joint, acromioclavicular joint, and the “floating” scapulothoracic joint.  The glenohumeral joint is the mobile joint in the human body as it is a “ball and socket” joint. It has three degrees of freedom,Continue Reading »

Keeping the Fat Out of Your Rotator Cuff

Keeping the Fat Out of Your Rotator Cuff

For most of us, the idea of “fighting fat” is nothing new. But fat is not just an enemy of your waistline. It’s an enemy of your muscles, too—especially when you are recovering from rotator cuff surgery. When the rotator cuff tendon is torn, a gap between the tendon and bones is formed. Your bodyContinue Reading »

Avoid Rotator Cuff Surgery with Physical Therapy

Avoid Rotator Cuff Surgery with Physical Therapy

Your shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint made up of three dominant bones—the humerus, clavicle and scapula. The rotator cuff consists of a group of four tendons and associated muscles that collectively work to keep the arm bone within the socket of your shoulder bladewhile allowing your arm to raise and rotate. Although damage to the rotatorContinue Reading »

Rotator Cuff Surgery for the Second Time

Rotator Cuff Surgery for the Second Time

If you have already gone through rotator cuff surgery, the last thing you want to think about is doing it all over again. Unfortunately, many patients do suffer tears of the same tendons that caused them to need surgery in the first place. Most of the time, this is not the surgeon’s fault, nor doesContinue Reading »

Returning to Action After Biceps Tenodesis

Returning to Action After Biceps Tenodesis

The biceps tendon runs from the biceps muscle through the rotator cuff and into the shoulder joint, where it then attaches to the socket. If the biceps tendon becomes inflamed or irritated, a condition called bicep tendinopathy, you may need to undergo surgery called biceps tenodesis to relieve the discomfort. Although it can develop slowly overContinue Reading »

Treating a SICK Scapula

Treating a SICK Scapula

When a scapula, or shoulder blade, is described as SICK, it doesn’t mean ill; it is actually an acronym invented by researchers/physicians who observed a syndrome involving the shoulder areas of professional baseball players. It stands for Scapula Internal rotation, Coracoid pain and Dyskinesia (SICK), the conditions that make up this syndrome. Because the scapulaContinue Reading »

Keeping Shoulder Pain at Bay

Keeping Shoulder Pain at Bay

Shoulder impingement syndrome can involve bursitis (inflammation of the shoulder’s bursa), tendinitis (inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons), calcium deposits in the tendons or any combination of the three. People at risk include those who employ repeated overhead movements—tennis players, golfers, swimmers, construction workers and, quite commonly, those who perform do-it-yourself repairs around the home.Continue Reading »

Effective Physical Therapy for Shoulder Dislocations

Effective Physical Therapy for Shoulder Dislocations

If you have dislocated your shoulder,choosing the best mode of treatment to get you moving and free from pain as quickly as possible can be a real challenge. One kind of shoulder dislocation, multidirectional shoulder instability, tends to occur in younger adults and may need surgery, along with physical therapy, to provide relief.   Care shouldContinue Reading »

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